October Meeting

The discussion of this month’s book, John Henry Newman: His Inner Life, was lively and the atmosphere sparked with strong views of this character, Blessed Newman.  All agreed, however, that his overriding goal in life was to do the will of God, come what may, which led him down unexpected paths.    His remarkable giftedness and keen sensitivity has often led Blessed Newman to be misunderstood, both during his life, by friend and foe, and down to our own time.  Since this month’s gathering covered only the first seven chapters of the book, we can hardly wait for the discussion of the second half of the book at the November 8th gathering of the “Getaways”.

  At the meetflannery-oconnor-self-portraiting, members, again after lively banter, tea, and chocolates, lighted upon the Flannery O’Connor novel, Wise Blood, for the December 13th gathering.   Since most of the books we have read have been non-fiction, it was time to tackle a novel.  Flannery O’Connor was born in 1925 in Savannah, Georgia.  She was  a devout Catholic her whole life and died at the age of 39 of lupus.  As a Christian writer, her work is message-oriented, yet she is far too brilliant a stylist to tip her hand; like all good writers, crass didacticism is abhorrent to her. Nevertheless, she achieves what few Christian writers have ever achieved: a type of writing that stands up on both literary and the religious grounds, and succeeds in doing justice to both.  The novel Wise Blood can be read as a dark comedy, a philosophical novel,  and an unsual case study of heresy and redemption.  Although none of our members had read this novel, the synopsis and reviews of it promise to make it intriguing fodder for our December 13th getaway get-together.  Here are a couple  random reviews of the book:

“I was more impressed by Wise Blood than any novel I have read for a long time. Her picture of the world is literally terrifying. Kafka is almost the only one of our contemporaries who has achieved such effects. I have tremendous admiration for the work of this young writer.”—Caroline Gordon

“No other major American writer of our century has constructed a fictional world so energetically and forthrightly charged by religious investigation.”–Brad Leithauser, The New Yorker
Review

wise blood

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